sexual abuse
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GC: n

S: UNESCO – http://portal.unesco.org/es/ev.php-URL_ID=48368&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html (last access: 12 May 2013); APA – http://www.apa.org/topics/sexual-abuse/ (last access: 21 May 2015).

N: 1. – sexual (adj): 1650s, “of or pertaining to the fact of being male or female,” from Late Latin sexualis “relating to sex,” from Latin sexus. Meaning “pertaining to copulation or generation” is from 1766; sexual intercourse attested by 1771; sexual orientation by 1967; sexual harassment by 1975. Sexual revolution attested by 1962. Sexual politics is from 1970. Related: Sexually.
– abuse (n): mid-15c., “improper practice,” from Old French abus (14c.), from Latin abusus “a using up”. From 1570s as “violation, defilement” (surviving in self-abuse “masturbation,” if at all). In reference to drugs by 1961. Modern use in reference to unwanted sexual activity is from late 20c. Earlier in Middle English was abusion “wicked act or practice, shameful thing, violation of decency” (early 14c.), “an insult” (mid-14c.), from Old French abusion, from Latin abusio.
2. Sexual abuse is unwanted sexual activity, with perpetrators using force, making threats or taking advantage of victims not able to give consent. Most victims and perpetrators know each other. Immediate reactions to sexual abuse include shock, fear or disbelief. Long-term symptoms include anxiety, fear or post-traumatic stress disorder. While efforts to treat sex offenders remain unpromising, psychological interventions for survivors — especially group therapy — appears effective.

S: 1. OED – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=sexual+abuse (last access: 21 July 2017). 2. APA – http://www.apa.org/topics/sexual-abuse/ (last access: 21 May 2015).

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CR: abuse of authority, breach of trust.