aphonia
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GC: n

S: http://www.allaboutcounseling.com/library/aphonia/ (last access: 28 February 2016); http://www.mountsinai.org/patient-care/health-library/diseases-and-conditions/aphonia (last access: 28 February 2016).

N: 1. “want of voice, loss of voice, having no sound,” 1719, from Modern Latin aphonia, from Greek aphonia “speechlessness,” noun of quality from aphonos “voiceless,” from a-, privative prefix, + phone “voice,” from PIE root *bha- “to speak, tell, say” + abstract noun ending -ia. Less-common anglicized form aphony is attested from 1827.
2. loss of voice; inability to produce vocal sounds.
3. a condition characterized by loss of the ability to produce normal speech sounds that results from overuse of the vocal cords, organic disease, or psychological causes, such as anxiety. Kinds of aphonia include aphonia clericorum, aphonia paralytica, aphonia paranoica, and spastic aphonia. See also speech dysfunction. aphonic, aphonous, adj.
4. Loss of voice (also called aphonia) may take several different forms. You may have a partial loss of your voice and it may sound hoarse. Or, you may have complete loss of your voice and it may sound like a whisper. Loss of voice can come on slowly or quickly depending on the cause.
Aphonia is different from aphasia, which is a language disorder.

S: 1. OED – http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=aphonia (last access: 28 February 2016). 2. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/aphonia – DORLAND (last access: 28 February 2016). 3. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/aphonia – Mosby’s Medical Dictionary (last access: 28 February 2016). 4. http://www.mountsinai.org/patient-care/health-library/diseases-and-conditions/aphonia (last access: 28 February 2016).

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CR: anarthria, aphasia, dysphasia, dysphonia.