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hurricane

GC: n

S: DC - http://www.disastercenter.com/guide/hurricane.pdf(external link) (last access: 9 December 2013); METEOTERM - http://wmo.multicorpora.net/MultiTransWeb/Web.mvc(external link) (last access: 11 December 2013); EncBrit.

N: 1. 1550s, a partially deformed adoptation from Spanish huracan (Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo y Valdés, "Historia General y Natural de las Indias," 1547-9), furacan (in the works of Pedro Mártir De Anghiera, chaplain to the court of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella and historian of Spanish explorations), from an Arawakan (W. Indies) word. In Portuguese, it became furacão. For confusion of initial -f- and -h- in Spanish, see hacienda.
2. hurricane, local name in the Caribbean, North Atlantic, and eastern North Pacific regions for a large tropical cyclone.
3. Hurricanes and tropical storms are cyclones with tropical origins (tropical cyclones). When the winds of a tropical storm (winds 39 to 73 miles per hour) reach a constant speed of 74 miles per hour or more, it is called a hurricane.
4. Name given to a warm core tropical cyclone with maximum surface wind of 118 km•h|~|-1 (64 knots, 74 mph) or greater (hurricane force wind) in the North Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, and in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean.
A tropical cyclone with hurricane force winds in the South Pacific and South-East Indian Ocean.
5. Name given to a warm core tropical cyclone with maximum surface wind of 118 km h-1 (64 knots, 74 mph) or greater (hurricane force wind) in the North Atlantic, the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, and in the Eastern North Pacific Ocean.
6. In the Beaufort scale of wind force, Hurricane Force (Force 12) is defined as a wind of 64 knots or more, sustained over a period of at least 10 minutes.
7. Typhoons and hurricanes are both tropical storms with winds greater than 75 mph. Typhoons occur in the Pacific, hurricanes in the Atlantic. Cyclones occur south of the equator, with winds greater than 30 mph. Typhoons and hurricanes, which occur north of the equator, rotate counterclockwise. Cyclones, south of the equator, rotate clockwise.
8. Collocations:
  • Hurricane + verb: hit sth, strike (sth) | blow, blow itself out.
  • Hurricane + noun: force hurricane-force winds.
  • Prep.: in a/the ~ The roof blew off in a hurricane.
  • Phrases: the eye of the hurricane (= the central point).
9. Cultural Interrelation: Hurricane Katrina was one of the top five deadliest and most expensive hurricanes in the history of the United States. At least 1,833 people died from the hurricane and the aftermath, and the estimated cost was at $81 billion (2005 USD). The hurricane began as a Category 1 hurricane in August 2005 when it hit the Bahamas and Florida, but strengthened to a Category 5 in the Gulf of Mexico before landing in Louisiana as a Category 3.

S: 1. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=hurricane&searchmode=none(external link) (last access: 4 September 2014). 2. EncBrit. 3. DC - http://www.disastercenter.com/guide/hurricane.pdf(external link) (last access: 9 December 2013). 4. METEOTERM - http://wmo.multicorpora.net/MultiTransWeb/Web.mvc(external link) (last access: 11 December 2013). 5, 6 & 7. TERMIUMPLUS. 8. http://oxforddictionary.so8848.com/search?word=hurricane(external link) (last access: 30 May 2015). 9. http://www.ranker.com/list/10-biggest-deadliest-most-destructive-hurricane_s-ever-/jeff419(external link) (last access: 30 May 2015).

SYN: 1. tropical cyclone. 2. typhoon. 3. tropical storm. (depending on context)

S: 1. GDT; RWP - http://www.who.int/hac/about/reliefweb-aug2008.pdf(external link) (last access: 4 August 2015) (p. 54). 2. GDT. 3. http://www.who.int/hac/about/reliefweb-aug2008.pdf(external link) (last access: 4 August 2015) (p. 54).

CR: cyclogenesis, cyclone (EN), explosive cyclogenesis, jet stream, natural disaster, storm, thunderstorm.

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