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banished person

GC: n

S: Crimjotwell - https://bit.ly/2slEp9H(external link) (last access: 9 April 2017); JSTOR - https://bit.ly/2C8YzIO(external link) (last access: 9 April 2017).

N: 1. - banished (adj): From past participle of verb banish: late 14c., banischen, "to condemn (someone) by proclamation or edict to leave the country, to outlaw by political or judicial authority," from banniss-, extended stem of Old French banir "announce, proclaim; levy; forbid; banish, proclaim an outlaw" (12c., Modern French bannir), from a Germanic source (perhaps Frankish *bannjan "to order or prohibit under penalty"), from Proto-Germanic *bannan (see ban (v.)). The French word might be by way of Medieval Latin bannire, also from Germanic (compare bandit). The general sense of "send or drive away, expel" is from c. 1400. Related: Banished; banishing.
- person (n): early 13c., from Old French persone "human being, anyone, person" (12c., Modern French personne) and directly from Latin persona "human being, person, personage; a part in a drama, assumed character," originally "mask, false face," such as those of wood or clay worn by the actors in later Roman theater.
In legal use, "corporate body or corporation having legal rights," 15c., short for person aggregate (c. 1400), person corporate (mid-15c.). The use of -person to replace -man in compounds and avoid alleged sexist connotations is first recorded 1971 (in chairperson). In person "by bodily presence" is from 1560s. Person-to-person first recorded 1919, originally of telephone calls.
2. To banish is, literally, to put out of a community or country by ban or civil interdict, and indicates a complete removal out of sight, perhaps to a distance.
To exile is simply to cause to leave one's place or country, and is often used reflexively: it emphasizes the idea of leaving home, while banish emphasizes rather that of being forced by some authority to leave it .... (Century Dictionary)
3. As verbs the difference between banished and outcast is that banished is (banish) while outcast is to cast out; to banish.
As a adjective outcast is that has been cast out; banished, ostracized.
As a noun outcast is one that has been excluded from a society or system, a pariah.
4. As nouns the difference between outlaw and outcast is that outlaw is a fugitive from the law while outcast is one that has been excluded from a society or system, a pariah.
As verbs the difference between outlaw and outcast is that outlaw is to declare illegal while outcast is to cast out; to banish.
As an adjective outcast is that has been cast out; banished, ostracized.
5. Cultural Interrelation: We can mention Banished, a British drama television serial created by Jimmy McGovern in 2015

S: 1 & 2. OED - https://bit.ly/2Rf9X05;(external link) https://bit.ly/2F9gAL3(external link) (last access: 9 April 2017). 3 & 4. WikiDiff - https://bit.ly/2LYE8CT;(external link) https://bit.ly/2QAB28S(external link) (last access: 9 April 2017). 5. IMDb - https://imdb.to/1I5c0oe(external link) (last access: 9 April 2017).

SYN:
S:

CR: banishment, deportation (EN), deportee, displaced person, exile, exiled, expellee, extradited person, extradition (EN).






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